about design dialogues

The Design Dialogues site houses all online publications from the School of Design Strategies at Parsons School of Design.

This site is funded by the Stephan Weiss Lecture Series on Business Strategy, Negotiation and Innovation. This lectureship was launched in 2002 to commemorate the life of the late artist and sculptor Stephan Weiss, husband and business partner of the fashion designer Donna Karan. Weiss co-founded Donna Karan International in 1984, and was instrumental in every significant venture the company undertook: launching and structuring new brands, most notably the Donna Karan Beauty company; signing new licenses; establishing in-house legal and creative departments; devising its computer design technology; orchestrating the company’s initial public offering in 1996; and negotiating its sale to the current owner LVMH Moet Hennessy – Louis Vuitton.

about the school of design strategies


The School of Design Strategies is an experimental educational environment. We advance innovative approaches in design, business and education. In the evolving context of cities, services and ecosystems, we explore design as a capability and a strategy in the environmentally conscious practices of individuals, groups, communities and organizations. For more about the School of Design Strategies, visit the SDS Magazine.

http://sds.parsons.edu/designdialogues
Journal of Design Strategies
Designing W/
The Integral City
New York, Phnom Pehn. Phnom Pehn, New York.
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previous
genealogy of urban form
pen sereypagna & brian mcgrath

New York, Phnom Pehn.

economy of shape

mikaela kvan



Phnom Penh is a magnet for growth that is gaining attention from corporations around the globe. Huge dividends re-shuffle the peri-urban mix. Residents are paying the price— environmentally and socially.

Economy of Space is an urban design strategy that focuses on togetherness and intention.


Samnang taught me that reverence for nature and giving through action are two elements of Khmer culture that play integral roles in Cambodian life.

Phnom Penh is a magnet for growth that draws attention from countries such as South Korea and Japan, as well as international companies investing in factory construction. Private foreign investment drives hotel, casino, business, residential, and industrial development in the inner and surrounding peri-urban. These projects resort the urban fabric and leave existing residents usually at an environmental, and social loss.

Inspired by Khvay Samnang's creative process and work, I embrace urban design as a means to shape urban forms with intention. The Economy of Shape is an urban design strategy that focuses on togetherness and intention in two interacting areas: Phnom Penh proper and the surrounding peri-urban—a mix of industry, agriculture, and urban villages interspersed with high-priced residential enclaves.

01

samnang cow taxi moves sand, khvay samnang, 2011. Similar to Samnang, I employ urban design as a practice that shapes urban forms with intention. My strategy draws the peri-urban area together through an imagined live-work scenario inspired by Samnang Cow Taxi Moves Sand.

02

peri-urban analysis, mikaela kvan, 2013. Urban change at the edge of Phenom Pehn, with its new factories, is more subtle and fine grain than the inner city, but equally as uncertain.

01

samnang cow taxi moves sand, khvay samnang, 2011. Similar to Samnang, I employ urban design as a practice that shapes urban forms with intention. My strategy draws the peri-urban area together through an imagined live-work scenario inspired by Samnang Cow Taxi Moves Sand.



This strategy brings together the inner and surrounding peri-urban through an imagined live-work scenario inspired by Khvay Samnang's Samnang Cow Taxi Moves Sand. Khvay taught me that reverence for nature and giving through action are two elements of Khmer culture that play an integral role in Cambodian daily life. The primary aim of this project is to enable urban growth that fosters both of these Buddhist fundamentals in a city pinned by global pressures. Informed by the existing spatial heterogeneity, my project provides a framework for supporting Cambodians’ ability to remain tied to their land—meaning greater control of their own food production—and to a community of family and friends.

03

section study, mikaela kvan, 2013. My project proposes to increase street density so that everyday life and work can coexist along a road as well as remnant farmland in the middle of emerging mega-blocks.

04

patch analysis, mikaela kvan, 2013. clockwise & top, down 01 Agriculture: dominates the production landscape; dramatically reduced; no longer has dominant presence. 02 Arterial Roads: adjacent patches are large; adjacent patches cover less and no longer bisect entire frame; adjacent patches are increasingly heterogeneous. 03 Unlinked Patches: dispersed; strung together by sand infill in rice paddies; connected by new development.

05

edge study, mikaela kvan, 2013. My project aims to hold the diffuse reorganizing of the periphery against some hard edges that are formed by live- work communities.

03

section study, mikaela kvan, 2013. My project proposes to increase street density so that everyday life and work can coexist along a road as well as remnant farmland in the middle of emerging mega-blocks.

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ksach phnom
marco roël rangel
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genealogy of urban form
pen sereypagna & brian mcgrath

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ksach phnom
marco roël rangel
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